pgn4web testing thread

Forum-related questions, complaints and discussion...

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby pgn4web » Sat Mar 10, 2012 1:49 pm

Uly wrote:Also, this used to work yesterday while today it seems... broken.

Image


Just noticed this: if you still can see the coordinates, this means your browser is serving you an old version of the js file, probably mixed with the newer version of the html file... no surprise if nothing works.

If the chessboard does not seem to work, PLEASE EMPTY THE BROWSER CACHE!
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Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby pgn4web » Sat Mar 10, 2012 11:51 pm

Also developed a "puzzle mode" for the chassboard, basically the moves are hidden at game load and shown as soon as the user moves forward.

See at the bottom of this page:
http://pgn4web-test.casaschi.net/drupal/node/1

It should not be difficult to create a [chesspuzzle] bbcode for phpbb or other forums, very similar to that.
pgn4web
 
Posts: 97
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Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby Uly » Sun Mar 11, 2012 1:27 pm

pgn4web wrote:If the chessboard does not seem to work, PLEASE EMPTY THE BROWSER CACHE!


Right, after I reloaded the .js file things went to normal, still, the scrollbar that appears seems way too thin:

Image

Also, the problem with the font size and wasted space seems to be caused because it's picking up the monospace font in my browser, which I think it's a bad idea as more space is wasted for spaces which is unnecessary and since the PGN is justified, the monospacing doesn't take effect anyway. I guess Jeremy's customization didn't have this problem.

Anyway,for actual testing:

[Date "1851.06.21"]
[Result "1-0"]
[FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]
[White "Adolf Andersson"]
[Black "Lionel Kieseritzky"]
{The Immortal Game was a chess game played on 21 June 1851 by Adolf Anderssen and Lionel Kieseritzky. The very bold sacrifices made by Anderssen to finally secure victory have made it one of the most famous chess games of all time. Anderssen gave up both rooks and a bishop, then his queen, checkmating his opponent with his three remaining minor pieces. It has been called an achievement "perhaps unparalleled in chess literature."[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immortal_Game}
1.e4 e5 2.f4 { This is the King's Gambit: Anderssen offers his pawn in exchange for faster development. Although this was a common opening in the nineteenth century, it is less common today, as defensive techniques have improved since Anderssen's time } 2...exf4 { Kieseritzky accepts the gambit; this variant is thus called the King's Gambit Accepted. } 3.Bc4 Qh4+?! { Black's move will force White to move his king and White will not be able to castle, but this move also places Black's queen in peril, and White can eventually attack it with gain of tempo with Ng1-f3. } 4.Kf1 b5 { This is the Bryan Counter-gambit, deeply analysed by Kieseritzky, and which sometimes bears his name. It is not considered a sound move by most players today. } 5.Bxb5 Nf6 6.Nf3 { This is a common developing move, but the knight now attacks Black's queen, forcing Black to protect it instead of developing his own side. } 6...Qh6 7.d3 { With this move, White now has solidified control over the critical center of the board. German grandmaster Robert Hübner recommends 7. Nc3 instead. } 7...Nh5 { This move threatens Ng3+, and it protects the pawn at f4, but it also sidelines the knight to a poor position at the edge of the board, where knights are the least powerful. } 8.Nh4 Qg5 { Better was 8. ... g6, according to Kieseritzky. } 9.Nf5 c6 { This simultaneously unpins the queen pawn and attacks the bishop. However, some have suggested 9. ... g6 would be better, to deal with a very troublesome knight. Notice how the players in those days developed one or two pieces, then moved them again and again. } 10.g4 Nf6 11.Rg1! { This is an advantageous passive piece sacrifice. If Black accepts, his queen will be moved away from the action, giving White a lead in development. } 11...cxb5? { Hübner believes this was Black's critical mistake; this gains material, but loses in development, at a point where White's strong development is able to quickly mount an offensive. Hübner recommends 11. ... h5 instead. } 12.h4! { White's knight at f5 protects the pawn, which is attacking Black's queen. } 12...Qg6 13.h5 Qg5 14.Qf3 { White (Anderssen) now has two threats:

* Bxf4, which will trap Black's queen (the queen has no safe place to go),
* e5, which would attack Black's knight at f6 while simultaneously exposing an attack by White's queen on the unprotected black rook at a8. } 14...Ng8 { This deals with the threats, but undevelops Black even further — now the only Black piece not on its starting square is the queen, which is about to be put on the run, while White has control over a great deal of the board. } 15.Bxf4 Qf6 16.Nc3 Bc5 { An ordinary developing move by Black, which also attacks the rook at g1. } 17.Nd5!? { White responds to the attack with a counter-attack. This move threatens Nc7, which would fork the king and rook. Richard Réti recommends 17. d4 ... 18. Nd5, which results in an advantage for White. } 17...Qxb2 { Black gains a pawn, and threatens to gain the rook at a1 with check. } 18.Bd6! { With this move White offers to sacrifice both his rooks. Hübner comments that, from this position, there are actually many ways to win, and he believes there are at least three better moves than 18. Bd6: 18. d4, 18. Be3, or 18. Re1, which lead to strong positions or checkmate without needing to sacrifice so much material. The commercial version of the chess-playing computer program Junior recommends 18. Nc7+, followed by Re1. Garry Kasparov has pointed out that the world of chess would have lost one of its "crown jewels" if the game had continued in such an unspectacular fashion. The Bd6 move is unusual, because White is willing to give up so much material. } 18...Bxg1? { It is from this move that Black's defeat stems. Wilhelm Steinitz suggested in 1879 that a better move would be 18... Qxa1+; likely moves to follow are 19. Ke2 Qb2 20. Kd2 Bxg1. } 19.e5! { This sacrifices yet another White rook. More importantly, this move blocks the Queen from participating in the defense of her king, and threatening mate in 2: 19. Nxg7+ Kd8 20. Bc7#. } 19...Qxa1+ 20.Ke2 { At this point, Black's attack has run out of power; Black has a queen and bishop on the back rank, but cannot effectively mount an immediate attack on White, while White can storm forward. According to Kieseritzky, he resigned at this point. Hübner notes that an article by Friedrich Amelung in the journal Baltische Schachblaetter, 1893, reported that Kiesertizky probably played 20. ... Na6, but Anderssen then announced the mating moves. In any case, it is suspected that the last few moves were not actually played on the board in the original game. } 20...Na6 { The Black Knight covers the c7 square as White was threatening 21. Nxg7+ Kd8 and 22. Bc7#. Another attempt to defend would be 20... Ba6 allowing the Black King to flee via Kc8 and Kb7, although White has enough with the continuation 21. Nc7+ Kd8 and 22 Nxa6 where now on 22... Qxa2 to defend f7 against Bc7+, Nd6+ and Qf7#, White can play 23. Bc7+ Ke8 24. Nb4 d5 25. Nd6+ and White wins or 22... Bb6 (preventing Bc7+) 23. Qa8 Qc3 24. Qxb8 Qc8 25. Qxc8 Kxc8 26. Bf8 h6 27. Nd6+ Kd8 28. Nxf7+ Ke8 29. Nxh8 Kxf8 with a winning endgame for White. } 21.Nxg7+ Kd8 22.Qf6+! { This beautiful Queen sacrifice forces Black to give up his defense of e7. } 22...Nxf6 23.Be7 { At the end, Black is ahead in material by a considerable margin: a queen, two rooks and a bishop. But the material does not help Black. White has been able to use his remaining pieces - two knights and a bishop - to force mate.

Savielly Tartakower described this as "a beautiful game." }
1-0

Um, I don't know, have you considered an implementation of comments similar to the one from where I stole that PGN?:

http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthr ... 294&page=1

Instead of showing comments in the move list, they hide them, but mark the moves with comments differently (so the user knows they have comments), and have a special box below the board to display comments (I guess the box could be hidden if the game doesn't have comments.)

Erm, okay, now, for testing the variations:

[Event "24 hours per move"]
[Site "Rybka forum"]
[Date "2009.11.04"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tzafrir, Shahar"]
[Black "Rybka Warriors, Forum"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B20"]
[Annotator "Tzafrir,Shahar"]
[PlyCount "135"]
[EventDate "2009.11.04"]
[EventType "corr"]

{A 24 hour/move game: HEM vs. the Rybka forum team; part of two game
simultaneous white/black match that started on November 4th 2009 and concluded
on December 31st 2009. The other game (Rybka-Warriors had White) ended in a
draw. State of the art chess-engines / computers were used by both sides
throughout the game. The Rybka team played in consultation using a team-vote
approach to decide their moves. According to my post mortem analysis, Black
is losing by force after its 23rd move.} 1. e4 c5 2. b4 cxb4 3. Nf3 Nf6 $6 {3.
..d5 and 3. ..d6 are more common. Judging by this game, it's clear why.
White's aim in the Wing gambit is to gain time, and Nf6 plays to White's hands.
} 4. e5 Nd5 5. a3 e6 (5... bxa3 6. Bxa3 $32) 6. axb4 Bxb4 7. Na3 {With a
c4->Nc2->Nxb4 plan.} Nc6 ({Only one previous rated game on record with 7.Na3:
[Event "Moscow RGSU-B"] [Date 2006.11. 16"] [Round "11"] [White "Kislov, Oleg"]
[Black "Mozharov, Mikhail"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2267"] [BlackElo "2418"]
} 7... O-O 8. c4 Nf4 9. Nc2 Ba5 10. Ba3 Re8 11. h4 f6 12. exf6 Qxf6 13. g3 Ng6
14. Bd6 Nc6 15. Bd3 Bc7 $4 16. Bxc7 {1:0}) 8. c4 Nde7 9. Nc2 $146 O-O $6 {An
unwarranted concession of Black's bishop} (9... Ba5 $142 $13) 10. Nxb4 {I
spent 4 tempi to exchange the bishop realizing I have sufficient development
advantage (from the early b4 sac and e5 push) to not incur any penalty doing
so. Black has anyway spent and will spend equal time on his knights jumping
around. More important, White's subsequent plan and moves all follow naturally
after this exchange.} Nxb4 11. Ba3 Nec6 {This is Black's *sixth* Knight jump
in the first eleven moves of the game - 54.5% of Black's opening moves
dedicated to a knight tour.} 12. Qb1 a5 13. Bd3 {Provoking f5 or even better
(for White) g6} f5 (13... h6 $142 $11 {I would have forced a draw had Black
played h6.} 14. Bh7+ Kh8 15. Be4 Rb8 16. O-O d5 17. exd6 Qxd6 18. h3 Rd8 19.
Rd1 b5 20. Bxc6 Qxc6 21. Bxb4 axb4 22. Qxb4 Qxc4 23. Qxc4 bxc4 24. Ne5 Rd5 25.
Nxc4 $11 {While 13. ..h6 was safer, Black can't be blamed, being a pawn up,
for not sensing the danger the position holds and avoiding the drawing line.})
(13... g6 $143 14. h4 $40) 14. Be2 {Lost a tempo but achieved provoking the
weakening f5 that allows the subsequent h3->g4 break ideas for White. An extra
benefit is that f5 also slows down the development of Black's c8 bishop and
cramps Black's position.} d5 15. exd6 Qxd6 16. d4 Bd7 {Start of a slow Black
plan to place the bishop at h5. I'm not sure this was the best plan for Black
as it allows White to peacefully finish development. Then again, it's already
hard to come with a viable other plan.} ({Possibly a better/faster plan was
b6->Bb7->Rad8->Rfe8, or b6->Ba6} 16... b6 $142 17. O-O Bb7 $13 (17... Ba6 $144
$13)) 17. Qb2 Be8 18. O-O Bh5 19. Rfd1 Rae8 $6 {Likely the culprit of Black's
subsequent trouble.} (19... Rac8 $142 20. Rd2 $13 (20. h3 $144 $13) (20. Ng5
$144 Bxe2 21. Qxe2 $13)) 20. Rd2 b6 {Black has a hard time finding a plan as
evident by this last 'waiting' move.} 21. Rad1 $14 Re7 {By now White has more
than enough compensation for the saced pawn - White position is harmonious and
Black needs to struggle to find an equalizing plan.} 22. h3 $1 {Preparing g4!
I played this now before Qb3 and Bb2 to 'hide' the g4 plan and try and make
this look like an inconspicuous 'luft' or waiting move by White. I expected
another waiting move from Black in return per the recent two non-moves Black
just played - most likely h6 that was indeed played. Objectively it's quite
hard to find a plan or a move here for Black that doesn't hurt its position
further.} h6 23. Qb3 Rc8 {According to my post-mortem analysis, White is
winning by force after this move.} 24. Bb2 Nd8 $2 {A 'computer like' move that
is not only 'not pretty' but worse it loses control of the key e5 square and
probably underestimated (or missed?) the strength of White's subsequent two
shots. However it's not easy to come up with a move that offers harder
resistance, as Black is already in a predicament. My analysis post mortem
shows Black is losing by force after White's 24th Bb2 move.} (24... Bxf3 $144 {
An attempt that doesn't seem to work.} 25. Bxf3 Kh7 26. Bc3 $14 (26. Be2 $13))
(24... Rce8 $144 {An attempt that doesn't seem to work.} 25. Nh4 Bxe2 $8 26.
Rxe2 Qd8 (26... g5 $143 27. Ng6 Rg7 28. Ne5 Nxe5 29. Rxe5 Rge7 30. Bc3 Qc7 31.
Bxb4 axb4 32. Qxb4 Rd8 33. Re3 $16) 27. Qf3 (27. Qg3 Rd7 28. Rde1 Qg5) (27. d5
Rd7 28. Nf3 exd5 29. Red2 Kh7 30. cxd5 Ne7 31. d6 Nec6 $13) 27... Rf7 28. Qh5
Qg5 29. Qxg5 hxg5 30. Nf3 Nd8 31. d5 g4 32. hxg4 fxg4 33. Nd4 $16) (24... f4
$142 $5 {Appears to have been Black's best attempt; however it's refuted as
well.} 25. Nh4 $142 (25. Bc3 $143 Ree8 (25... Rb8 26. Qb1 Rd8 27. Ng5 hxg5 28.
Bxh5 $14) (25... Rd8 26. Qb1 b5 27. d5 exd5 28. cxd5 Qc5 29. dxc6 Rxd2 30. Rxd2
Qxc3 31. Qf5 $14) 26. d5 exd5 27. cxd5 Nd8 28. Qb2 Nf7 29. Bxg7 Qg6 30. Nh4
Qxg7 31. Qxg7+ Kxg7 32. Bxh5 Re5 33. Bxf7 Kxf7 34. d6 $13) 25... a4 $142 (25...
Bxe2 $143 26. Rxe2 Rd7 27. d5 Rcd8 28. Bxg7 Kxg7 29. Qf3 Qe7 30. Nf5+ exf5 31.
Rxe7+ Nxe7 32. Re1 $16) 26. Qxa4 Ra7 (26... Bxe2 $143 27. Rxe2 Ra7 28. Qb3 $14)
27. Qb3 Na5 28. Qa3 Bxe2 (28... Nac6 $143 29. Qc3 Bxe2 30. Rxe2 Na5 31. Ba3 $18
) 29. Rxe2 Rcc7 (29... Rxc4 $143 30. d5 $16) 30. Rde1 Nxc4 31. Qb3 Na5 32. Qf3
Nc2 33. Rd1 $16) 25. g4 $1 {White's pieces are all optimally placed. It's time
to convert White's positional advantage to material with the g4 and d5 break.
Any delay in the break could have allowed Black to equalize. It's like knowing
to not fall in love in a stock you own and when to sell - it was hard for me
to 'ruin' White's beautiful position with 25. g4, but the time has come to
break and convert.} fxg4 26. Ne5 Be8 (26... Ndc6 $143 27. hxg4 Be8 28. g5 hxg5
29. Qg3 Nxe5 30. dxe5 Qc7 31. Rd6 Na6 (31... Ba4 32. R1d4 $18) 32. Qxg5 $16)
27. d5 $3 {Thematic break. Chess engines, even after a long analysis time,
don't realize this is the strongest forcing move here.} (27. Bxg4 h5 $14) 27...
exd5 28. Bxg4 Ndc6 {Black is forced to give up an exchange looking for an
endgame he hopes is drawish. Black's alternatives per the following analysis
were worse.} (28... Rcc7 $143 $4 29. Rxd5 Nxd5 30. Rxd5 Qf6 31. Rxd8 $18) (
28... Rc5 $143 29. cxd5 h5 (29... Bb5 30. f4 Rcc7 (30... Kf8 31. Bd4 Rxd5 32.
Bf3 Ndc6 33. Bxd5 $18) 31. Bf5 Be8 32. Rg2 $18) 30. Bf5 h4 31. Nc6 Ndxc6 32.
dxc6+ Bf7 33. Qxb4 axb4 34. Rxd6 $18) (28... Ne6 $142 {28. ..Ne6 offered an
interesting defence although White still reaches a very promising position
through 33. Qe3!} 29. cxd5 Nc5 30. Qc3 Ra8 (30... Rb8 $143 31. Nc4 Qf4 32. Rd4
Ne4 33. Qe3 Qxe3 34. fxe3 Ba4 35. Rc1 Nf6 36. d6 $18) 31. Nc4 Qg6 $8 32. d6 Ne4
33. Qe3 $1 (33. Qc1 $143 Re6 (33... Nxd2 34. dxe7 $18) 34. Kh2 (34. f4 Nxd2 35.
Rxd2 Re4 36. d7 Rd8 37. Nd6 Rxd7 38. Nxe4 Rxd2 39. f5 Rc2 40. fxg6 Rxc1+ 41.
Bxc1 Bxg6 $13) 34... Na2 35. Qa1 Nxd2 36. Rxd2 Bf7 37. Be5 Nb4 38. Nxb6 $14)
33... Nxd2 34. dxe7 Nxc4 35. Qe6+ Kh7 (35... Qxe6 $143 36. Bxe6+ Kh7 37. Rd8
Nxb2 38. Rxa8 $18) 36. Rd8 $16) 29. Bxc8 Nxe5 30. Bxe5 Rxe5 (30... Qxe5 $143
31. cxd5 Bf7 32. Bg4 $14) 31. cxd5 {Black now faces a major decision - 31. ..
Bf7 vs. 31. ..Rg5+. According to the game and the analysis herein, both lose
by force, although 31. ..Rg5+ offered tougher resistance via some very
difficult lines.} Bf7 $4 {Black expects 31. ..Bf7 to lead to a drawish endgame.
However this is refuted in the game and further in the following analysis.
The endgame reached after 31. ..Bf7 while very much outside the horizon of
current chess engines, is losing by force with a simple plan. The game was
played at a 24 hours per move time-control. However the Black team took a
'time out' and spent 4 days on this difficult move. I dare guess the Black
team ended up playing the more dubious 31. ..Bf7?? due to having over-analyzed
31. ..Rg5+ and not being able to find a forcing drawing line there, opted for
the seemingly more drawish endgame after 31. ..Bf7. I further believe that
with only 24 hours for the move, the Black team was more likely to have played
the more natural looking 31. ..Rg5+.} (31... Rg5+ $142 {Leads to some very
complicated lines, with 3 main tries for Black, and a very narrow path White
must walk through, with a series of 'only moves' White must find to maintain
the win / avoid a draw.} 32. Kh1 $8 {Black now has 3 main attempts: 32. ..Qf6,
32. ..Bh5, 32. ..a4. And further 2 easier to refute attempts: 32.. Bg6, 32. ..
Bf7. I believe only 32. ..Qf6 challenges White (and I present its refutation
too), but I'll quickly address all five attempts with their respective
refutations.} {First attempt: 32. ..Qf6} Qf6 ({Second attempt: ..Bh5} 32... Bh5
$143 33. Bg4 Bxg4 (33... Bg6 $143 34. Re2 Kh7 35. Re6 Qf4 36. d6) (33... Na6
$143 34. Bxh5 Rxh5 35. Qf3 Rg5 36. Rc2 $16) (33... a4 $143 34. Qg3 Bxg4 35.
hxg4 Qd7 36. f3 Nxd5 $16) 34. hxg4 Rxg4 35. Qh3 Re4 (35... Qd7 $143 36. d6 Nc6
37. f3 Rg1+ 38. Kh2 Qxh3+ 39. Kxh3 Rxd1 40. Rxd1 Kf7 41. Rc1 Nb8 $16) (35... h5
$143 36. f3 Rg6 37. Qc8+ Kh7 38. Qf5 $18) (35... Rf4 $143 36. Qe6+ Qxe6 37.
dxe6 Re4 38. Rd6 $18) (35... Rg6 $143 36. Qc8+ Kh7 37. Qf5 Kg8 38. Rc1 Rf6 39.
Rc8+ $18) 36. Qc8+ Qf8 37. Qxf8+ Kxf8 38. d6 Re8 39. d7 Rd8 $16) ({Third
attempt: ..a4} 32... a4 $143 33. Qf3 Bh5 34. Bg4 Bxg4 35. hxg4 Na6 36. Rd4 Nc5
37. Kg2 Kh7 38. Qf4 Rg6 39. Qxd6 Rxd6 40. Rb4 $18) ({Fourth attempt: ..Bg6:}
32... Bg6 $143 33. Be6+ Kh7 (33... Kh8 $143 34. Qe3 $18) 34. Qf3 Bh5 (34... Nc6
$143 35. h4 Rh5 36. Kg2 Ne5 37. Qf4 $18) 35. Bf5+ Kh8 36. Bg4 Bxg4 37. hxg4 $18
) ({Fifth attempt: ..Bf7:} 32... Bf7 $143 33. Be6 Qf4 (33... Na6 $143 34. Re2
$18) 34. Qe3 Qxe3 (34... Qf6 $143 35. f4 $16) 35. fxe3 Bxe6 (35... Re5 $143 36.
Bxf7+ Kxf7 37. d6 $18) 36. dxe6 Re5 37. Rd6 $18) 33. Re1 $3 {All other
attempts e.g. 33. d6+, 33. h4 only draw.} Ba4 (33... Bf7 $143 34. Be6 a4 35.
Qd1 a3 36. Bxf7+ Qxf7 37. d6 a2 38. d7 a1=Q 39. d8=Q+ Kh7 40. Qe8 Qc3 41. Qe4+
Qf5 42. f3 Nc6 43. Qdc2 Qxc2 44. Rxc2 Nd4 45. Rc3 Rg6 46. Qxf5 Nxf5 $18 {
Reaches the same type of won end-game the game has reached. White will win the
b pawn, force exchanging rooks etc as in the game.}) 34. Qe3 Kh8 35. Be6 Nc2 $8
36. Rxc2 Bxc2 37. f4 Rg6 $8 38. Qe5 (38. d6 $143 Ba4 39. Qf3 Qd8 40. f5 Rf6 41.
Qd5) 38... Kh7 (38... Qxe5 $143 39. fxe5 $18) 39. f5 Rg5 $8 40. Qxf6 gxf6 41.
d6 Ba4 (41... Rg3 $143 42. d7 Rxh3+ 43. Kg2 Rd3 44. Rc1 Ba4 45. Rc7 $18) 42.
Rc1 Rg7 43. h4 $18) 32. Be6 $18 {White plan is simple: win Blacks a & b pawns
without making any concessions. Activate the rooks, force swapping rooks and
reach a won K+R+PP vs. K+N+PP 8 pieces end-game. Chess engines have a hard
time evaluating this endgame, forming and executing this plan as it's outside
the horizon and 6-pieces tablebase offer surprisingly little help. Instead the
chess engines shuffle pieces without their eval making much progress. This is
a nice example where a long term human plan sees, well, longer.} Bxe6 (32...
Qe7 33. Bxf7+ Qxf7 34. f4 Rf5 35. Qc4 Rxf4 36. Qc8+ Kh7 37. d6 $18) 33. dxe6
Qxe6 34. Rd8+ Kh7 $8 35. Qxe6 Rxe6 36. R8d6 Re4 37. Rxb6 a4 38. Ra1 Nd5 (38...
Nd3 $144 39. Ra3 Rd4 (39... Nf4 40. Ra6) 40. Rb7) 39. Rb7 h5 $2 {Unnecessary
weakening of the pawn structure. Black's plan was to play h4 later and try to
create a fortress. However it does not work.} 40. Kg2 $1 {Essential part of
the winning plan. Not allow the king to get caged.} Rd4 (40... h4 {[%emt 0:00:
00] Post mortem one of Black's comments was they believed 40. ..h4 could have
created a fortress. This segment refutes that.} 41. Rg1 Ne7 (41... Re6 42. Kf3
Ne7 43. Rg4 Rf6+ 44. Kg2 Nf5 (44... Ng6 45. Ra7 a3 (45... Nf4+ 46. Kf1 Ng6 47.
Raxa4 Rc6 48. Kg2 Rf6 49. Rge4 Rb6 50. f4 Rb7 51. f5 Ne7 52. Rxh4+ Kg8 $18) 46.
Rxa3 Nf4+ 47. Kf1 Ng6 48. Ke2 Nf4+ 49. Kd2 Rd6+ (49... Ng6 50. Ke3 Rb6 51. f4
Kg8 52. Rg5 Ne7 53. Kf3 Rb7 54. Kg4 Rc7 55. Kxh4 $18) 50. Ke3 Nd5+ 51. Kf3 Nf6
52. Rxh4+ $18) 45. Rxa4 Kg6 (45... Rg6+ 46. Rg4 Ra6 47. Rgb4) 46. Rba7 Kh5 47.
R4a6 Rxa6 (47... Rf8 48. f4 Rd8 49. Kf3) 48. Rxa6 Nd4 49. Ra5+ Kg6 50. Ra4 Nf5
51. Kf3 Nh6 52. Rxh4) (41... Rc4 42. Kh2 Nc7 43. Rg4 Rc2 44. Rxh4+ $18) 42. Kf3
Re6 43. Rg4 Rf6+ 44. Rf4 Nf5 45. Ra7 a3 46. Rxa3 Kg6 47. Ra5 Kg5 48. Rg4+ Kh6
49. Rga4 Nd4+ 50. Ke3 Nf5+ 51. Ke4 Nd6+ 52. Kd5 Ne8 53. Rxh4+ Kg6 $18) 41. Ra7
Nc3 $6 {Losing another tempo. However there are no better alternatives by now
anyway.} 42. Rc1 Nd5 43. Rc6 $1 {Much better than 43. Rg1 - a plan that some
chess engines opt for but doesn't seem to work. 43. Rc6 activates the rook.}
Nf4+ 44. Kg3 {White's plan is to accept a few Checks from Black, and in
between play f3 and h4 to get control of g5 to place there a rook later -
threatening to win either g or h pawn thus forcing exchanging rooks.} a3 45.
Rcc7 Ne6 $8 46. Re7 Rd6 47. Rxa3 {First part of the plan complete.} Kh6 48.
Rea7 {White now needs to force exchanging a pair of rooks to reach a won
end-game. Still most chess engines are unable to determine a winning plan here.
} Nc5 49. f3 $1 Rg6+ 50. Kf2 Rd6 51. h4 $1 {Second part of the plan complete.
Getting control of the key g5 square to allow placing a rook there in some
possible lines.} Nd3+ 52. Kg2 Rg6+ 53. Kh2 Nc5 54. Rc3 Ne6 55. Ra5 Nf4 56. Rf5
Ne2 {Ends the game at once by giving up Blacks h5 pawn, however all other
options lose fast as well.} (56... Rf6 $144 57. Rcc5 Kg6 (57... Rxf5 58. Rxf5
Ne2 59. Re5 Nd4 60. Kg3 g6 61. Kf4 Nc6 62. Rd5 Nb4 63. Rd6 Na2 64. Ke5 Nc3 65.
Kf6 Ne2 66. Rd8 Kh7 67. Kg5 Kg7 68. Rd7+ Kf8 69. Kf6 $18 {With mate shortly})
58. Rg5+ Kh6 59. Rcf5 Rxf5 (59... Ne2 60. Rxh5+ Kg6 61. Rhg5+ Kh6 62. Rxf6+
gxf6 63. Rc5 $18 {With mate shortly.}) 60. Rxf5 Ne6 61. Re5 $18 {With mate
shortly. This position highlights White's end-game plan after Black's 31. ..
Bf7 - exchanging rooks and reaching a won position, even had Black not
weakened the h6 pawn.}) 57. Rcc5 Ra6 58. Rxh5+ Kg6 59. Rhg5+ Kh6 60. Rc8 g6 (
60... Kh7 61. Rc7 Rg6 62. Rxg6 Kxg6 63. h5+ $18 {Reaching a won 6 pieces table
base positions in a few moves.}) 61. Rgc5 (61. Rg4 {Most chess engines prefer
Rg4, however as played 61. Rgc5 ends the game equally fast.}) 61... Ra4 (61...
Ra7 $144 62. R5c7 Rxc7 $8 63. Rxc7 $18 {Reaches a won 6 pieces table-base
position in a few moves}) 62. Rc4 Ra3 (62... Ra2 $144 63. Rc2 Rxc2 64. Rxc2 $18
{Reaches a won 6 pieces table-base position in a few moves.}) 63. R4c7 g5 $8
64. Rc6+ Kg7 65. R8c7+ Kf8 66. Rf6+ Kg8 67. Re6 Kf8 68. Rxe2 {Followed by mate.
The game ran from November 4th until December 31st 2009.} 1-0

:o

Apparently, this is a good test for the stability of pgn4web, as this PGN pastes correctly into Shredder Classic, but in the forum it's a big mess (as seen above):

[Event "24 hours per move"]
[Site "Rybka forum"]
[Date "2009.11.04"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tzafrir, Shahar"]
[Black "Rybka Warriors, Forum"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B20"]
[Annotator "Tzafrir,Shahar"]
[PlyCount "135"]
[EventDate "2009.11.04"]
[EventType "corr"]

{A 24 hour/move game: HEM vs. the Rybka forum team; part of two game
simultaneous white/black match that started on November 4th 2009 and concluded
on December 31st 2009. The other game (Rybka-Warriors had White) ended in a
draw. State of the art chess-engines / computers were used by both sides
throughout the game. The Rybka team played in consultation using a team-vote
approach to decide their moves. According to my post mortem analysis, Black
is losing by force after its 23rd move.} 1. e4 c5 2. b4 cxb4 3. Nf3 Nf6 $6 {3.
..d5 and 3. ..d6 are more common. Judging by this game, it's clear why.
White's aim in the Wing gambit is to gain time, and Nf6 plays to White's hands.
} 4. e5 Nd5 5. a3 e6 (5... bxa3 6. Bxa3 $32) 6. axb4 Bxb4 7. Na3 {With a
c4->Nc2->Nxb4 plan.} Nc6 ({Only one previous rated game on record with 7.Na3:
[Event "Moscow RGSU-B"] [Date 2006.11. 16"] [Round "11"] [White "Kislov, Oleg"]
[Black "Mozharov, Mikhail"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2267"] [BlackElo "2418"]
} 7... O-O 8. c4 Nf4 9. Nc2 Ba5 10. Ba3 Re8 11. h4 f6 12. exf6 Qxf6 13. g3 Ng6
14. Bd6 Nc6 15. Bd3 Bc7 $4 16. Bxc7 {1:0}) 8. c4 Nde7 9. Nc2 $146 O-O $6 {An
unwarranted concession of Black's bishop} (9... Ba5 $142 $13) 10. Nxb4 {I
spent 4 tempi to exchange the bishop realizing I have sufficient development
advantage (from the early b4 sac and e5 push) to not incur any penalty doing
so. Black has anyway spent and will spend equal time on his knights jumping
around. More important, White's subsequent plan and moves all follow naturally
after this exchange.} Nxb4 11. Ba3 Nec6 {This is Black's *sixth* Knight jump
in the first eleven moves of the game - 54.5% of Black's opening moves
dedicated to a knight tour.} 12. Qb1 a5 13. Bd3 {Provoking f5 or even better
(for White) g6} f5 (13... h6 $142 $11 {I would have forced a draw had Black
played h6.} 14. Bh7+ Kh8 15. Be4 Rb8 16. O-O d5 17. exd6 Qxd6 18. h3 Rd8 19.
Rd1 b5 20. Bxc6 Qxc6 21. Bxb4 axb4 22. Qxb4 Qxc4 23. Qxc4 bxc4 24. Ne5 Rd5 25.
Nxc4 $11 {While 13. ..h6 was safer, Black can't be blamed, being a pawn up,
for not sensing the danger the position holds and avoiding the drawing line.})
(13... g6 $143 14. h4 $40) 14. Be2 {Lost a tempo but achieved provoking the
weakening f5 that allows the subsequent h3->g4 break ideas for White. An extra
benefit is that f5 also slows down the development of Black's c8 bishop and
cramps Black's position.} d5 15. exd6 Qxd6 16. d4 Bd7 {Start of a slow Black
plan to place the bishop at h5. I'm not sure this was the best plan for Black
as it allows White to peacefully finish development. Then again, it's already
hard to come with a viable other plan.} ({Possibly a better/faster plan was
b6->Bb7->Rad8->Rfe8, or b6->Ba6} 16... b6 $142 17. O-O Bb7 $13 (17... Ba6 $144
$13)) 17. Qb2 Be8 18. O-O Bh5 19. Rfd1 Rae8 $6 {Likely the culprit of Black's
subsequent trouble.} (19... Rac8 $142 20. Rd2 $13 (20. h3 $144 $13) (20. Ng5
$144 Bxe2 21. Qxe2 $13)) 20. Rd2 b6 {Black has a hard time finding a plan as
evident by this last 'waiting' move.} 21. Rad1 $14 Re7 {By now White has more
than enough compensation for the saced pawn - White position is harmonious and
Black needs to struggle to find an equalizing plan.} 22. h3 $1 {Preparing g4!
I played this now before Qb3 and Bb2 to 'hide' the g4 plan and try and make
this look like an inconspicuous 'luft' or waiting move by White. I expected
another waiting move from Black in return per the recent two non-moves Black
just played - most likely h6 that was indeed played. Objectively it's quite
hard to find a plan or a move here for Black that doesn't hurt its position
further.} h6 23. Qb3 Rc8 {According to my post-mortem analysis, White is
winning by force after this move.} 24. Bb2 Nd8 $2 {A 'computer like' move that
is not only 'not pretty' but worse it loses control of the key e5 square and
probably underestimated (or missed?) the strength of White's subsequent two
shots. However it's not easy to come up with a move that offers harder
resistance, as Black is already in a predicament. My analysis post mortem
shows Black is losing by force after White's 24th Bb2 move.} (24... Bxf3 $144 {
An attempt that doesn't seem to work.} 25. Bxf3 Kh7 26. Bc3 $14 (26. Be2 $13))
(24... Rce8 $144 {An attempt that doesn't seem to work.} 25. Nh4 Bxe2 $8 26.
Rxe2 Qd8 (26... g5 $143 27. Ng6 Rg7 28. Ne5 Nxe5 29. Rxe5 Rge7 30. Bc3 Qc7 31.
Bxb4 axb4 32. Qxb4 Rd8 33. Re3 $16) 27. Qf3 (27. Qg3 Rd7 28. Rde1 Qg5) (27. d5
Rd7 28. Nf3 exd5 29. Red2 Kh7 30. cxd5 Ne7 31. d6 Nec6 $13) 27... Rf7 28. Qh5
Qg5 29. Qxg5 hxg5 30. Nf3 Nd8 31. d5 g4 32. hxg4 fxg4 33. Nd4 $16) (24... f4
$142 $5 {Appears to have been Black's best attempt; however it's refuted as
well.} 25. Nh4 $142 (25. Bc3 $143 Ree8 (25... Rb8 26. Qb1 Rd8 27. Ng5 hxg5 28.
Bxh5 $14) (25... Rd8 26. Qb1 b5 27. d5 exd5 28. cxd5 Qc5 29. dxc6 Rxd2 30. Rxd2
Qxc3 31. Qf5 $14) 26. d5 exd5 27. cxd5 Nd8 28. Qb2 Nf7 29. Bxg7 Qg6 30. Nh4
Qxg7 31. Qxg7+ Kxg7 32. Bxh5 Re5 33. Bxf7 Kxf7 34. d6 $13) 25... a4 $142 (25...
Bxe2 $143 26. Rxe2 Rd7 27. d5 Rcd8 28. Bxg7 Kxg7 29. Qf3 Qe7 30. Nf5+ exf5 31.
Rxe7+ Nxe7 32. Re1 $16) 26. Qxa4 Ra7 (26... Bxe2 $143 27. Rxe2 Ra7 28. Qb3 $14)
27. Qb3 Na5 28. Qa3 Bxe2 (28... Nac6 $143 29. Qc3 Bxe2 30. Rxe2 Na5 31. Ba3 $18
) 29. Rxe2 Rcc7 (29... Rxc4 $143 30. d5 $16) 30. Rde1 Nxc4 31. Qb3 Na5 32. Qf3
Nc2 33. Rd1 $16) 25. g4 $1 {White's pieces are all optimally placed. It's time
to convert White's positional advantage to material with the g4 and d5 break.
Any delay in the break could have allowed Black to equalize. It's like knowing
to not fall in love in a stock you own and when to sell - it was hard for me
to 'ruin' White's beautiful position with 25. g4, but the time has come to
break and convert.} fxg4 26. Ne5 Be8 (26... Ndc6 $143 27. hxg4 Be8 28. g5 hxg5
29. Qg3 Nxe5 30. dxe5 Qc7 31. Rd6 Na6 (31... Ba4 32. R1d4 $18) 32. Qxg5 $16)
27. d5 $3 {Thematic break. Chess engines, even after a long analysis time,
don't realize this is the strongest forcing move here.} (27. Bxg4 h5 $14) 27...
exd5 28. Bxg4 Ndc6 {Black is forced to give up an exchange looking for an
endgame he hopes is drawish. Black's alternatives per the following analysis
were worse.} (28... Rcc7 $143 $4 29. Rxd5 Nxd5 30. Rxd5 Qf6 31. Rxd8 $18) (
28... Rc5 $143 29. cxd5 h5 (29... Bb5 30. f4 Rcc7 (30... Kf8 31. Bd4 Rxd5 32.
Bf3 Ndc6 33. Bxd5 $18) 31. Bf5 Be8 32. Rg2 $18) 30. Bf5 h4 31. Nc6 Ndxc6 32.
dxc6+ Bf7 33. Qxb4 axb4 34. Rxd6 $18) (28... Ne6 $142 {28. ..Ne6 offered an
interesting defence although White still reaches a very promising position
through 33. Qe3!} 29. cxd5 Nc5 30. Qc3 Ra8 (30... Rb8 $143 31. Nc4 Qf4 32. Rd4
Ne4 33. Qe3 Qxe3 34. fxe3 Ba4 35. Rc1 Nf6 36. d6 $18) 31. Nc4 Qg6 $8 32. d6 Ne4
33. Qe3 $1 (33. Qc1 $143 Re6 (33... Nxd2 34. dxe7 $18) 34. Kh2 (34. f4 Nxd2 35.
Rxd2 Re4 36. d7 Rd8 37. Nd6 Rxd7 38. Nxe4 Rxd2 39. f5 Rc2 40. fxg6 Rxc1+ 41.
Bxc1 Bxg6 $13) 34... Na2 35. Qa1 Nxd2 36. Rxd2 Bf7 37. Be5 Nb4 38. Nxb6 $14)
33... Nxd2 34. dxe7 Nxc4 35. Qe6+ Kh7 (35... Qxe6 $143 36. Bxe6+ Kh7 37. Rd8
Nxb2 38. Rxa8 $18) 36. Rd8 $16) 29. Bxc8 Nxe5 30. Bxe5 Rxe5 (30... Qxe5 $143
31. cxd5 Bf7 32. Bg4 $14) 31. cxd5 {Black now faces a major decision - 31. ..
Bf7 vs. 31. ..Rg5+. According to the game and the analysis herein, both lose
by force, although 31. ..Rg5+ offered tougher resistance via some very
difficult lines.} Bf7 $4 {Black expects 31. ..Bf7 to lead to a drawish endgame.
However this is refuted in the game and further in the following analysis.
The endgame reached after 31. ..Bf7 while very much outside the horizon of
current chess engines, is losing by force with a simple plan. The game was
played at a 24 hours per move time-control. However the Black team took a
'time out' and spent 4 days on this difficult move. I dare guess the Black
team ended up playing the more dubious 31. ..Bf7?? due to having over-analyzed
31. ..Rg5+ and not being able to find a forcing drawing line there, opted for
the seemingly more drawish endgame after 31. ..Bf7. I further believe that
with only 24 hours for the move, the Black team was more likely to have played
the more natural looking 31. ..Rg5+.} (31... Rg5+ $142 {Leads to some very
complicated lines, with 3 main tries for Black, and a very narrow path White
must walk through, with a series of 'only moves' White must find to maintain
the win / avoid a draw.} 32. Kh1 $8 {Black now has 3 main attempts: 32. ..Qf6,
32. ..Bh5, 32. ..a4. And further 2 easier to refute attempts: 32.. Bg6, 32. ..
Bf7. I believe only 32. ..Qf6 challenges White (and I present its refutation
too), but I'll quickly address all five attempts with their respective
refutations.} {First attempt: 32. ..Qf6} Qf6 ({Second attempt: ..Bh5} 32... Bh5
$143 33. Bg4 Bxg4 (33... Bg6 $143 34. Re2 Kh7 35. Re6 Qf4 36. d6) (33... Na6
$143 34. Bxh5 Rxh5 35. Qf3 Rg5 36. Rc2 $16) (33... a4 $143 34. Qg3 Bxg4 35.
hxg4 Qd7 36. f3 Nxd5 $16) 34. hxg4 Rxg4 35. Qh3 Re4 (35... Qd7 $143 36. d6 Nc6
37. f3 Rg1+ 38. Kh2 Qxh3+ 39. Kxh3 Rxd1 40. Rxd1 Kf7 41. Rc1 Nb8 $16) (35... h5
$143 36. f3 Rg6 37. Qc8+ Kh7 38. Qf5 $18) (35... Rf4 $143 36. Qe6+ Qxe6 37.
dxe6 Re4 38. Rd6 $18) (35... Rg6 $143 36. Qc8+ Kh7 37. Qf5 Kg8 38. Rc1 Rf6 39.
Rc8+ $18) 36. Qc8+ Qf8 37. Qxf8+ Kxf8 38. d6 Re8 39. d7 Rd8 $16) ({Third
attempt: ..a4} 32... a4 $143 33. Qf3 Bh5 34. Bg4 Bxg4 35. hxg4 Na6 36. Rd4 Nc5
37. Kg2 Kh7 38. Qf4 Rg6 39. Qxd6 Rxd6 40. Rb4 $18) ({Fourth attempt: ..Bg6:}
32... Bg6 $143 33. Be6+ Kh7 (33... Kh8 $143 34. Qe3 $18) 34. Qf3 Bh5 (34... Nc6
$143 35. h4 Rh5 36. Kg2 Ne5 37. Qf4 $18) 35. Bf5+ Kh8 36. Bg4 Bxg4 37. hxg4 $18
) ({Fifth attempt: ..Bf7:} 32... Bf7 $143 33. Be6 Qf4 (33... Na6 $143 34. Re2
$18) 34. Qe3 Qxe3 (34... Qf6 $143 35. f4 $16) 35. fxe3 Bxe6 (35... Re5 $143 36.
Bxf7+ Kxf7 37. d6 $18) 36. dxe6 Re5 37. Rd6 $18) 33. Re1 $3 {All other
attempts e.g. 33. d6+, 33. h4 only draw.} Ba4 (33... Bf7 $143 34. Be6 a4 35.
Qd1 a3 36. Bxf7+ Qxf7 37. d6 a2 38. d7 a1=Q 39. d8=Q+ Kh7 40. Qe8 Qc3 41. Qe4+
Qf5 42. f3 Nc6 43. Qdc2 Qxc2 44. Rxc2 Nd4 45. Rc3 Rg6 46. Qxf5 Nxf5 $18 {
Reaches the same type of won end-game the game has reached. White will win the
b pawn, force exchanging rooks etc as in the game.}) 34. Qe3 Kh8 35. Be6 Nc2 $8
36. Rxc2 Bxc2 37. f4 Rg6 $8 38. Qe5 (38. d6 $143 Ba4 39. Qf3 Qd8 40. f5 Rf6 41.
Qd5) 38... Kh7 (38... Qxe5 $143 39. fxe5 $18) 39. f5 Rg5 $8 40. Qxf6 gxf6 41.
d6 Ba4 (41... Rg3 $143 42. d7 Rxh3+ 43. Kg2 Rd3 44. Rc1 Ba4 45. Rc7 $18) 42.
Rc1 Rg7 43. h4 $18) 32. Be6 $18 {White plan is simple: win Blacks a & b pawns
without making any concessions. Activate the rooks, force swapping rooks and
reach a won K+R+PP vs. K+N+PP 8 pieces end-game. Chess engines have a hard
time evaluating this endgame, forming and executing this plan as it's outside
the horizon and 6-pieces tablebase offer surprisingly little help. Instead the
chess engines shuffle pieces without their eval making much progress. This is
a nice example where a long term human plan sees, well, longer.} Bxe6 (32...
Qe7 33. Bxf7+ Qxf7 34. f4 Rf5 35. Qc4 Rxf4 36. Qc8+ Kh7 37. d6 $18) 33. dxe6
Qxe6 34. Rd8+ Kh7 $8 35. Qxe6 Rxe6 36. R8d6 Re4 37. Rxb6 a4 38. Ra1 Nd5 (38...
Nd3 $144 39. Ra3 Rd4 (39... Nf4 40. Ra6) 40. Rb7) 39. Rb7 h5 $2 {Unnecessary
weakening of the pawn structure. Black's plan was to play h4 later and try to
create a fortress. However it does not work.} 40. Kg2 $1 {Essential part of
the winning plan. Not allow the king to get caged.} Rd4 (40... h4 {[%emt 0:00:
00] Post mortem one of Black's comments was they believed 40. ..h4 could have
created a fortress. This segment refutes that.} 41. Rg1 Ne7 (41... Re6 42. Kf3
Ne7 43. Rg4 Rf6+ 44. Kg2 Nf5 (44... Ng6 45. Ra7 a3 (45... Nf4+ 46. Kf1 Ng6 47.
Raxa4 Rc6 48. Kg2 Rf6 49. Rge4 Rb6 50. f4 Rb7 51. f5 Ne7 52. Rxh4+ Kg8 $18) 46.
Rxa3 Nf4+ 47. Kf1 Ng6 48. Ke2 Nf4+ 49. Kd2 Rd6+ (49... Ng6 50. Ke3 Rb6 51. f4
Kg8 52. Rg5 Ne7 53. Kf3 Rb7 54. Kg4 Rc7 55. Kxh4 $18) 50. Ke3 Nd5+ 51. Kf3 Nf6
52. Rxh4+ $18) 45. Rxa4 Kg6 (45... Rg6+ 46. Rg4 Ra6 47. Rgb4) 46. Rba7 Kh5 47.
R4a6 Rxa6 (47... Rf8 48. f4 Rd8 49. Kf3) 48. Rxa6 Nd4 49. Ra5+ Kg6 50. Ra4 Nf5
51. Kf3 Nh6 52. Rxh4) (41... Rc4 42. Kh2 Nc7 43. Rg4 Rc2 44. Rxh4+ $18) 42. Kf3
Re6 43. Rg4 Rf6+ 44. Rf4 Nf5 45. Ra7 a3 46. Rxa3 Kg6 47. Ra5 Kg5 48. Rg4+ Kh6
49. Rga4 Nd4+ 50. Ke3 Nf5+ 51. Ke4 Nd6+ 52. Kd5 Ne8 53. Rxh4+ Kg6 $18) 41. Ra7
Nc3 $6 {Losing another tempo. However there are no better alternatives by now
anyway.} 42. Rc1 Nd5 43. Rc6 $1 {Much better than 43. Rg1 - a plan that some
chess engines opt for but doesn't seem to work. 43. Rc6 activates the rook.}
Nf4+ 44. Kg3 {White's plan is to accept a few Checks from Black, and in
between play f3 and h4 to get control of g5 to place there a rook later -
threatening to win either g or h pawn thus forcing exchanging rooks.} a3 45.
Rcc7 Ne6 $8 46. Re7 Rd6 47. Rxa3 {First part of the plan complete.} Kh6 48.
Rea7 {White now needs to force exchanging a pair of rooks to reach a won
end-game. Still most chess engines are unable to determine a winning plan here.
} Nc5 49. f3 $1 Rg6+ 50. Kf2 Rd6 51. h4 $1 {Second part of the plan complete.
Getting control of the key g5 square to allow placing a rook there in some
possible lines.} Nd3+ 52. Kg2 Rg6+ 53. Kh2 Nc5 54. Rc3 Ne6 55. Ra5 Nf4 56. Rf5
Ne2 {Ends the game at once by giving up Blacks h5 pawn, however all other
options lose fast as well.} (56... Rf6 $144 57. Rcc5 Kg6 (57... Rxf5 58. Rxf5
Ne2 59. Re5 Nd4 60. Kg3 g6 61. Kf4 Nc6 62. Rd5 Nb4 63. Rd6 Na2 64. Ke5 Nc3 65.
Kf6 Ne2 66. Rd8 Kh7 67. Kg5 Kg7 68. Rd7+ Kf8 69. Kf6 $18 {With mate shortly})
58. Rg5+ Kh6 59. Rcf5 Rxf5 (59... Ne2 60. Rxh5+ Kg6 61. Rhg5+ Kh6 62. Rxf6+
gxf6 63. Rc5 $18 {With mate shortly.}) 60. Rxf5 Ne6 61. Re5 $18 {With mate
shortly. This position highlights White's end-game plan after Black's 31. ..
Bf7 - exchanging rooks and reaching a won position, even had Black not
weakened the h6 pawn.}) 57. Rcc5 Ra6 58. Rxh5+ Kg6 59. Rhg5+ Kh6 60. Rc8 g6 (
60... Kh7 61. Rc7 Rg6 62. Rxg6 Kxg6 63. h5+ $18 {Reaching a won 6 pieces table
base positions in a few moves.}) 61. Rgc5 (61. Rg4 {Most chess engines prefer
Rg4, however as played 61. Rgc5 ends the game equally fast.}) 61... Ra4 (61...
Ra7 $144 62. R5c7 Rxc7 $8 63. Rxc7 $18 {Reaches a won 6 pieces table-base
position in a few moves}) 62. Rc4 Ra3 (62... Ra2 $144 63. Rc2 Rxc2 64. Rxc2 $18
{Reaches a won 6 pieces table-base position in a few moves.}) 63. R4c7 g5 $8
64. Rc6+ Kg7 65. R8c7+ Kf8 66. Rf6+ Kg8 67. Re6 Kf8 68. Rxe2 {Followed by mate.
The game ran from November 4th until December 31st 2009.} 1-0
User avatar
Uly
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:33 am

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby pgn4web » Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:59 pm

Uly wrote:Right, after I reloaded the .js file things went to normal, still, the scrollbar that appears seems way too thin:


which browser are you using?
I dont think I do any styling of the scrollbar...

Uly wrote:Also, the problem with the font size and wasted space seems to be caused because it's picking up the monospace font in my browser, which I think it's a bad idea as more space is wasted for spaces which is unnecessary and since the PGN is justified, the monospacing doesn't take effect anyway. I guess Jeremy's customization didn't have this problem.


If your browser picks a monospace font, there's an issue there, the font should be my custom web font, degrading to sans-serif if the browser cant load those web fonts. monospace is never used. I noticed some less than perfect font display under linux. Which browser and operating system are you using?

Uly wrote:Um, I don't know, have you considered an implementation of comments similar to the one from where I stole that PGN?:

http://www.redhotpawn.com/board/showthr ... 294&page=1

Instead of showing comments in the move list, they hide them, but mark the moves with comments differently (so the user knows they have comments), and have a special box below the board to display comments (I guess the box could be hidden if the game doesn't have comments.)


Hmmmm, what you suggest is an option, it should not be too difficult to implement, all of the building blocks are there, but I dont think I will doit. Just a matter of taste. If you want to fiddle and implement it yourself, I can give you directions.

About the game you posted, you have some HTML code in (or before or after) the PGN text: dont do that
pgn4web filters out all HTML code finds in the PGN text. Believe me, it's better NOT to let forum users inject code on the forum disguised as a chess game.

Uly wrote:Erm, okay, now, for testing the variations:

Apparently, this is a good test for the stability of pgn4web, as this PGN pastes correctly into Shredder Classic, but in the forum it's a big mess (as seen above):


Thanks, this is the kind of feedback I was looking for.

You hit a well known (by me) bug of the PGN parser: for a number of reasons too long to explain, if you have in the PGN text a comment with a sequence that looks like a PGN header, then the game parsing is broken. Indeed you have there:

Code: Select all
c4->Nc2->Nxb4 plan.} Nc6 ({Only one previous rated game on record with 7.Na3:
[Event "Moscow RGSU-B"] [Date 2006.11. 16"] [Round "11"] [White "Kislov, Oleg"]
[Black "Mozharov, Mikhail"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2267"] [BlackElo "2418"]
} 7... O-O 8. c4 Nf4 9. Nc2 Ba5 10. Ba3 Re8 11. h4 f6 12. exf6 Qxf6 13. g3 Ng6


If I replace that with

Code: Select all
c4->Nc2->Nxb4 plan.} Nc6 ({Only one previous rated game on record with 7.Na3:
Kislov, Oleg vs Mozharov, Mikhail, 1-0, 2006.11. 16, Moscow RGSU-B, Round 11
} 7... O-O 8. c4 Nf4 9. Nc2 Ba5 10. Ba3 Re8 11. h4 f6 12. exf6 Qxf6 13. g3 Ng6


Everything is back to normal.

[Event "24 hours per move"]
[Site "Rybka forum"]
[Date "2009.11.04"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tzafrir, Shahar"]
[Black "Rybka Warriors, Forum"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B20"]
[Annotator "Tzafrir,Shahar"]
[PlyCount "135"]
[EventDate "2009.11.04"]
[EventType "corr"]

{A 24 hour/move game: HEM vs. the Rybka forum team; part of two game
simultaneous white/black match that started on November 4th 2009 and concluded
on December 31st 2009. The other game (Rybka-Warriors had White) ended in a
draw. State of the art chess-engines / computers were used by both sides
throughout the game. The Rybka team played in consultation using a team-vote
approach to decide their moves. According to my post mortem analysis, Black
is losing by force after its 23rd move.} 1. e4 c5 2. b4 cxb4 3. Nf3 Nf6 $6 {3.
..d5 and 3. ..d6 are more common. Judging by this game, it's clear why.
White's aim in the Wing gambit is to gain time, and Nf6 plays to White's hands.
} 4. e5 Nd5 5. a3 e6 (5... bxa3 6. Bxa3 $32) 6. axb4 Bxb4 7. Na3 {With a
c4->Nc2->Nxb4 plan.} Nc6 ({Only one previous rated game on record with 7.Na3:
Kislov, Oleg vs Mozharov, Mikhail, 1-0, 2006.11. 16, Moscow RGSU-B, Round 11
} 7... O-O 8. c4 Nf4 9. Nc2 Ba5 10. Ba3 Re8 11. h4 f6 12. exf6 Qxf6 13. g3 Ng6
14. Bd6 Nc6 15. Bd3 Bc7 $4 16. Bxc7 {1:0}) 8. c4 Nde7 9. Nc2 $146 O-O $6 {An
unwarranted concession of Black's bishop} (9... Ba5 $142 $13) 10. Nxb4 {I
spent 4 tempi to exchange the bishop realizing I have sufficient development
advantage (from the early b4 sac and e5 push) to not incur any penalty doing
so. Black has anyway spent and will spend equal time on his knights jumping
around. More important, White's subsequent plan and moves all follow naturally
after this exchange.} Nxb4 11. Ba3 Nec6 {This is Black's *sixth* Knight jump
in the first eleven moves of the game - 54.5% of Black's opening moves
dedicated to a knight tour.} 12. Qb1 a5 13. Bd3 {Provoking f5 or even better
(for White) g6} f5 (13... h6 $142 $11 {I would have forced a draw had Black
played h6.} 14. Bh7+ Kh8 15. Be4 Rb8 16. O-O d5 17. exd6 Qxd6 18. h3 Rd8 19.
Rd1 b5 20. Bxc6 Qxc6 21. Bxb4 axb4 22. Qxb4 Qxc4 23. Qxc4 bxc4 24. Ne5 Rd5 25.
Nxc4 $11 {While 13. ..h6 was safer, Black can't be blamed, being a pawn up,
for not sensing the danger the position holds and avoiding the drawing line.})
(13... g6 $143 14. h4 $40) 14. Be2 {Lost a tempo but achieved provoking the
weakening f5 that allows the subsequent h3->g4 break ideas for White. An extra
benefit is that f5 also slows down the development of Black's c8 bishop and
cramps Black's position.} d5 15. exd6 Qxd6 16. d4 Bd7 {Start of a slow Black
plan to place the bishop at h5. I'm not sure this was the best plan for Black
as it allows White to peacefully finish development. Then again, it's already
hard to come with a viable other plan.} ({Possibly a better/faster plan was
b6->Bb7->Rad8->Rfe8, or b6->Ba6} 16... b6 $142 17. O-O Bb7 $13 (17... Ba6 $144
$13)) 17. Qb2 Be8 18. O-O Bh5 19. Rfd1 Rae8 $6 {Likely the culprit of Black's
subsequent trouble.} (19... Rac8 $142 20. Rd2 $13 (20. h3 $144 $13) (20. Ng5
$144 Bxe2 21. Qxe2 $13)) 20. Rd2 b6 {Black has a hard time finding a plan as
evident by this last 'waiting' move.} 21. Rad1 $14 Re7 {By now White has more
than enough compensation for the saced pawn - White position is harmonious and
Black needs to struggle to find an equalizing plan.} 22. h3 $1 {Preparing g4!
I played this now before Qb3 and Bb2 to 'hide' the g4 plan and try and make
this look like an inconspicuous 'luft' or waiting move by White. I expected
another waiting move from Black in return per the recent two non-moves Black
just played - most likely h6 that was indeed played. Objectively it's quite
hard to find a plan or a move here for Black that doesn't hurt its position
further.} h6 23. Qb3 Rc8 {According to my post-mortem analysis, White is
winning by force after this move.} 24. Bb2 Nd8 $2 {A 'computer like' move that
is not only 'not pretty' but worse it loses control of the key e5 square and
probably underestimated (or missed?) the strength of White's subsequent two
shots. However it's not easy to come up with a move that offers harder
resistance, as Black is already in a predicament. My analysis post mortem
shows Black is losing by force after White's 24th Bb2 move.} (24... Bxf3 $144 {
An attempt that doesn't seem to work.} 25. Bxf3 Kh7 26. Bc3 $14 (26. Be2 $13))
(24... Rce8 $144 {An attempt that doesn't seem to work.} 25. Nh4 Bxe2 $8 26.
Rxe2 Qd8 (26... g5 $143 27. Ng6 Rg7 28. Ne5 Nxe5 29. Rxe5 Rge7 30. Bc3 Qc7 31.
Bxb4 axb4 32. Qxb4 Rd8 33. Re3 $16) 27. Qf3 (27. Qg3 Rd7 28. Rde1 Qg5) (27. d5
Rd7 28. Nf3 exd5 29. Red2 Kh7 30. cxd5 Ne7 31. d6 Nec6 $13) 27... Rf7 28. Qh5
Qg5 29. Qxg5 hxg5 30. Nf3 Nd8 31. d5 g4 32. hxg4 fxg4 33. Nd4 $16) (24... f4
$142 $5 {Appears to have been Black's best attempt; however it's refuted as
well.} 25. Nh4 $142 (25. Bc3 $143 Ree8 (25... Rb8 26. Qb1 Rd8 27. Ng5 hxg5 28.
Bxh5 $14) (25... Rd8 26. Qb1 b5 27. d5 exd5 28. cxd5 Qc5 29. dxc6 Rxd2 30. Rxd2
Qxc3 31. Qf5 $14) 26. d5 exd5 27. cxd5 Nd8 28. Qb2 Nf7 29. Bxg7 Qg6 30. Nh4
Qxg7 31. Qxg7+ Kxg7 32. Bxh5 Re5 33. Bxf7 Kxf7 34. d6 $13) 25... a4 $142 (25...
Bxe2 $143 26. Rxe2 Rd7 27. d5 Rcd8 28. Bxg7 Kxg7 29. Qf3 Qe7 30. Nf5+ exf5 31.
Rxe7+ Nxe7 32. Re1 $16) 26. Qxa4 Ra7 (26... Bxe2 $143 27. Rxe2 Ra7 28. Qb3 $14)
27. Qb3 Na5 28. Qa3 Bxe2 (28... Nac6 $143 29. Qc3 Bxe2 30. Rxe2 Na5 31. Ba3 $18
) 29. Rxe2 Rcc7 (29... Rxc4 $143 30. d5 $16) 30. Rde1 Nxc4 31. Qb3 Na5 32. Qf3
Nc2 33. Rd1 $16) 25. g4 $1 {White's pieces are all optimally placed. It's time
to convert White's positional advantage to material with the g4 and d5 break.
Any delay in the break could have allowed Black to equalize. It's like knowing
to not fall in love in a stock you own and when to sell - it was hard for me
to 'ruin' White's beautiful position with 25. g4, but the time has come to
break and convert.} fxg4 26. Ne5 Be8 (26... Ndc6 $143 27. hxg4 Be8 28. g5 hxg5
29. Qg3 Nxe5 30. dxe5 Qc7 31. Rd6 Na6 (31... Ba4 32. R1d4 $18) 32. Qxg5 $16)
27. d5 $3 {Thematic break. Chess engines, even after a long analysis time,
don't realize this is the strongest forcing move here.} (27. Bxg4 h5 $14) 27...
exd5 28. Bxg4 Ndc6 {Black is forced to give up an exchange looking for an
endgame he hopes is drawish. Black's alternatives per the following analysis
were worse.} (28... Rcc7 $143 $4 29. Rxd5 Nxd5 30. Rxd5 Qf6 31. Rxd8 $18) (
28... Rc5 $143 29. cxd5 h5 (29... Bb5 30. f4 Rcc7 (30... Kf8 31. Bd4 Rxd5 32.
Bf3 Ndc6 33. Bxd5 $18) 31. Bf5 Be8 32. Rg2 $18) 30. Bf5 h4 31. Nc6 Ndxc6 32.
dxc6+ Bf7 33. Qxb4 axb4 34. Rxd6 $18) (28... Ne6 $142 {28. ..Ne6 offered an
interesting defence although White still reaches a very promising position
through 33. Qe3!} 29. cxd5 Nc5 30. Qc3 Ra8 (30... Rb8 $143 31. Nc4 Qf4 32. Rd4
Ne4 33. Qe3 Qxe3 34. fxe3 Ba4 35. Rc1 Nf6 36. d6 $18) 31. Nc4 Qg6 $8 32. d6 Ne4
33. Qe3 $1 (33. Qc1 $143 Re6 (33... Nxd2 34. dxe7 $18) 34. Kh2 (34. f4 Nxd2 35.
Rxd2 Re4 36. d7 Rd8 37. Nd6 Rxd7 38. Nxe4 Rxd2 39. f5 Rc2 40. fxg6 Rxc1+ 41.
Bxc1 Bxg6 $13) 34... Na2 35. Qa1 Nxd2 36. Rxd2 Bf7 37. Be5 Nb4 38. Nxb6 $14)
33... Nxd2 34. dxe7 Nxc4 35. Qe6+ Kh7 (35... Qxe6 $143 36. Bxe6+ Kh7 37. Rd8
Nxb2 38. Rxa8 $18) 36. Rd8 $16) 29. Bxc8 Nxe5 30. Bxe5 Rxe5 (30... Qxe5 $143
31. cxd5 Bf7 32. Bg4 $14) 31. cxd5 {Black now faces a major decision - 31. ..
Bf7 vs. 31. ..Rg5+. According to the game and the analysis herein, both lose
by force, although 31. ..Rg5+ offered tougher resistance via some very
difficult lines.} Bf7 $4 {Black expects 31. ..Bf7 to lead to a drawish endgame.
However this is refuted in the game and further in the following analysis.
The endgame reached after 31. ..Bf7 while very much outside the horizon of
current chess engines, is losing by force with a simple plan. The game was
played at a 24 hours per move time-control. However the Black team took a
'time out' and spent 4 days on this difficult move. I dare guess the Black
team ended up playing the more dubious 31. ..Bf7?? due to having over-analyzed
31. ..Rg5+ and not being able to find a forcing drawing line there, opted for
the seemingly more drawish endgame after 31. ..Bf7. I further believe that
with only 24 hours for the move, the Black team was more likely to have played
the more natural looking 31. ..Rg5+.} (31... Rg5+ $142 {Leads to some very
complicated lines, with 3 main tries for Black, and a very narrow path White
must walk through, with a series of 'only moves' White must find to maintain
the win / avoid a draw.} 32. Kh1 $8 {Black now has 3 main attempts: 32. ..Qf6,
32. ..Bh5, 32. ..a4. And further 2 easier to refute attempts: 32.. Bg6, 32. ..
Bf7. I believe only 32. ..Qf6 challenges White (and I present its refutation
too), but I'll quickly address all five attempts with their respective
refutations.} {First attempt: 32. ..Qf6} Qf6 ({Second attempt: ..Bh5} 32... Bh5
$143 33. Bg4 Bxg4 (33... Bg6 $143 34. Re2 Kh7 35. Re6 Qf4 36. d6) (33... Na6
$143 34. Bxh5 Rxh5 35. Qf3 Rg5 36. Rc2 $16) (33... a4 $143 34. Qg3 Bxg4 35.
hxg4 Qd7 36. f3 Nxd5 $16) 34. hxg4 Rxg4 35. Qh3 Re4 (35... Qd7 $143 36. d6 Nc6
37. f3 Rg1+ 38. Kh2 Qxh3+ 39. Kxh3 Rxd1 40. Rxd1 Kf7 41. Rc1 Nb8 $16) (35... h5
$143 36. f3 Rg6 37. Qc8+ Kh7 38. Qf5 $18) (35... Rf4 $143 36. Qe6+ Qxe6 37.
dxe6 Re4 38. Rd6 $18) (35... Rg6 $143 36. Qc8+ Kh7 37. Qf5 Kg8 38. Rc1 Rf6 39.
Rc8+ $18) 36. Qc8+ Qf8 37. Qxf8+ Kxf8 38. d6 Re8 39. d7 Rd8 $16) ({Third
attempt: ..a4} 32... a4 $143 33. Qf3 Bh5 34. Bg4 Bxg4 35. hxg4 Na6 36. Rd4 Nc5
37. Kg2 Kh7 38. Qf4 Rg6 39. Qxd6 Rxd6 40. Rb4 $18) ({Fourth attempt: ..Bg6:}
32... Bg6 $143 33. Be6+ Kh7 (33... Kh8 $143 34. Qe3 $18) 34. Qf3 Bh5 (34... Nc6
$143 35. h4 Rh5 36. Kg2 Ne5 37. Qf4 $18) 35. Bf5+ Kh8 36. Bg4 Bxg4 37. hxg4 $18
) ({Fifth attempt: ..Bf7:} 32... Bf7 $143 33. Be6 Qf4 (33... Na6 $143 34. Re2
$18) 34. Qe3 Qxe3 (34... Qf6 $143 35. f4 $16) 35. fxe3 Bxe6 (35... Re5 $143 36.
Bxf7+ Kxf7 37. d6 $18) 36. dxe6 Re5 37. Rd6 $18) 33. Re1 $3 {All other
attempts e.g. 33. d6+, 33. h4 only draw.} Ba4 (33... Bf7 $143 34. Be6 a4 35.
Qd1 a3 36. Bxf7+ Qxf7 37. d6 a2 38. d7 a1=Q 39. d8=Q+ Kh7 40. Qe8 Qc3 41. Qe4+
Qf5 42. f3 Nc6 43. Qdc2 Qxc2 44. Rxc2 Nd4 45. Rc3 Rg6 46. Qxf5 Nxf5 $18 {
Reaches the same type of won end-game the game has reached. White will win the
b pawn, force exchanging rooks etc as in the game.}) 34. Qe3 Kh8 35. Be6 Nc2 $8
36. Rxc2 Bxc2 37. f4 Rg6 $8 38. Qe5 (38. d6 $143 Ba4 39. Qf3 Qd8 40. f5 Rf6 41.
Qd5) 38... Kh7 (38... Qxe5 $143 39. fxe5 $18) 39. f5 Rg5 $8 40. Qxf6 gxf6 41.
d6 Ba4 (41... Rg3 $143 42. d7 Rxh3+ 43. Kg2 Rd3 44. Rc1 Ba4 45. Rc7 $18) 42.
Rc1 Rg7 43. h4 $18) 32. Be6 $18 {White plan is simple: win Blacks a & b pawns
without making any concessions. Activate the rooks, force swapping rooks and
reach a won K+R+PP vs. K+N+PP 8 pieces end-game. Chess engines have a hard
time evaluating this endgame, forming and executing this plan as it's outside
the horizon and 6-pieces tablebase offer surprisingly little help. Instead the
chess engines shuffle pieces without their eval making much progress. This is
a nice example where a long term human plan sees, well, longer.} Bxe6 (32...
Qe7 33. Bxf7+ Qxf7 34. f4 Rf5 35. Qc4 Rxf4 36. Qc8+ Kh7 37. d6 $18) 33. dxe6
Qxe6 34. Rd8+ Kh7 $8 35. Qxe6 Rxe6 36. R8d6 Re4 37. Rxb6 a4 38. Ra1 Nd5 (38...
Nd3 $144 39. Ra3 Rd4 (39... Nf4 40. Ra6) 40. Rb7) 39. Rb7 h5 $2 {Unnecessary
weakening of the pawn structure. Black's plan was to play h4 later and try to
create a fortress. However it does not work.} 40. Kg2 $1 {Essential part of
the winning plan. Not allow the king to get caged.} Rd4 (40... h4 {[%emt 0:00:
00] Post mortem one of Black's comments was they believed 40. ..h4 could have
created a fortress. This segment refutes that.} 41. Rg1 Ne7 (41... Re6 42. Kf3
Ne7 43. Rg4 Rf6+ 44. Kg2 Nf5 (44... Ng6 45. Ra7 a3 (45... Nf4+ 46. Kf1 Ng6 47.
Raxa4 Rc6 48. Kg2 Rf6 49. Rge4 Rb6 50. f4 Rb7 51. f5 Ne7 52. Rxh4+ Kg8 $18) 46.
Rxa3 Nf4+ 47. Kf1 Ng6 48. Ke2 Nf4+ 49. Kd2 Rd6+ (49... Ng6 50. Ke3 Rb6 51. f4
Kg8 52. Rg5 Ne7 53. Kf3 Rb7 54. Kg4 Rc7 55. Kxh4 $18) 50. Ke3 Nd5+ 51. Kf3 Nf6
52. Rxh4+ $18) 45. Rxa4 Kg6 (45... Rg6+ 46. Rg4 Ra6 47. Rgb4) 46. Rba7 Kh5 47.
R4a6 Rxa6 (47... Rf8 48. f4 Rd8 49. Kf3) 48. Rxa6 Nd4 49. Ra5+ Kg6 50. Ra4 Nf5
51. Kf3 Nh6 52. Rxh4) (41... Rc4 42. Kh2 Nc7 43. Rg4 Rc2 44. Rxh4+ $18) 42. Kf3
Re6 43. Rg4 Rf6+ 44. Rf4 Nf5 45. Ra7 a3 46. Rxa3 Kg6 47. Ra5 Kg5 48. Rg4+ Kh6
49. Rga4 Nd4+ 50. Ke3 Nf5+ 51. Ke4 Nd6+ 52. Kd5 Ne8 53. Rxh4+ Kg6 $18) 41. Ra7
Nc3 $6 {Losing another tempo. However there are no better alternatives by now
anyway.} 42. Rc1 Nd5 43. Rc6 $1 {Much better than 43. Rg1 - a plan that some
chess engines opt for but doesn't seem to work. 43. Rc6 activates the rook.}
Nf4+ 44. Kg3 {White's plan is to accept a few Checks from Black, and in
between play f3 and h4 to get control of g5 to place there a rook later -
threatening to win either g or h pawn thus forcing exchanging rooks.} a3 45.
Rcc7 Ne6 $8 46. Re7 Rd6 47. Rxa3 {First part of the plan complete.} Kh6 48.
Rea7 {White now needs to force exchanging a pair of rooks to reach a won
end-game. Still most chess engines are unable to determine a winning plan here.
} Nc5 49. f3 $1 Rg6+ 50. Kf2 Rd6 51. h4 $1 {Second part of the plan complete.
Getting control of the key g5 square to allow placing a rook there in some
possible lines.} Nd3+ 52. Kg2 Rg6+ 53. Kh2 Nc5 54. Rc3 Ne6 55. Ra5 Nf4 56. Rf5
Ne2 {Ends the game at once by giving up Blacks h5 pawn, however all other
options lose fast as well.} (56... Rf6 $144 57. Rcc5 Kg6 (57... Rxf5 58. Rxf5
Ne2 59. Re5 Nd4 60. Kg3 g6 61. Kf4 Nc6 62. Rd5 Nb4 63. Rd6 Na2 64. Ke5 Nc3 65.
Kf6 Ne2 66. Rd8 Kh7 67. Kg5 Kg7 68. Rd7+ Kf8 69. Kf6 $18 {With mate shortly})
58. Rg5+ Kh6 59. Rcf5 Rxf5 (59... Ne2 60. Rxh5+ Kg6 61. Rhg5+ Kh6 62. Rxf6+
gxf6 63. Rc5 $18 {With mate shortly.}) 60. Rxf5 Ne6 61. Re5 $18 {With mate
shortly. This position highlights White's end-game plan after Black's 31. ..
Bf7 - exchanging rooks and reaching a won position, even had Black not
weakened the h6 pawn.}) 57. Rcc5 Ra6 58. Rxh5+ Kg6 59. Rhg5+ Kh6 60. Rc8 g6 (
60... Kh7 61. Rc7 Rg6 62. Rxg6 Kxg6 63. h5+ $18 {Reaching a won 6 pieces table
base positions in a few moves.}) 61. Rgc5 (61. Rg4 {Most chess engines prefer
Rg4, however as played 61. Rgc5 ends the game equally fast.}) 61... Ra4 (61...
Ra7 $144 62. R5c7 Rxc7 $8 63. Rxc7 $18 {Reaches a won 6 pieces table-base
position in a few moves}) 62. Rc4 Ra3 (62... Ra2 $144 63. Rc2 Rxc2 64. Rxc2 $18
{Reaches a won 6 pieces table-base position in a few moves.}) 63. R4c7 g5 $8
64. Rc6+ Kg7 65. R8c7+ Kf8 66. Rf6+ Kg8 67. Re6 Kf8 68. Rxe2 {Followed by mate.
The game ran from November 4th until December 31st 2009.} 1-0

Thanks for the help!
pgn4web
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:26 pm

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby Uly » Mon Mar 12, 2012 3:49 am

pgn4web wrote:which browser are you using?
I dont think I do any styling of the scrollbar...


Firefox 4.0. The scrollbar sometimes is eaten completely and doesn't appear on screen, but the user can still scroll with the mousewheel.

(scrollbars were fine in Jeremy's "stable" build)

pgn4web wrote:If your browser picks a monospace font, there's an issue there, the font should be my custom web font, degrading to sans-serif if the browser cant load those web fonts. monospace is never used. I noticed some less than perfect font display under linux. Which browser and operating system are you using?


Windows XP 64bit.

(fonts were fine in Jeremy's "stable" build)

pgn4web wrote:Thanks, this is the kind of feedback I was looking for.


I knew I'd eventually get to that :D

Yeah, I guess pgn4web should wait till game result before looking for another game start.
User avatar
Uly
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:33 am

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby pgn4web » Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:21 pm

Uly wrote:Firefox 4.0. The scrollbar sometimes is eaten completely and doesn't appear on screen, but the user can still scroll with the mousewheel.


I'm sorry, but I think I will let this one go, I really cant support too old browsers. I try supporting what makes sense (all major broswer, IE/GC/FF/Op/Sa, the latest release and maybe to one prior to that), I cant do more than this, I hope you will understand. Otherwise I would have to fix IE6 before FF4.
As a side note though, the chessboard works on my firefox (iceweasel) 3.6 stil on my debian netbook.

Uly wrote:Yeah, I guess pgn4web should wait till game result before looking for another game start.


Its a lot more complex than that (for instance, what if a game does not have a result token?), I think I found a way to fix the problem (with a negligible impact on load speed though).
pgn4web
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:26 pm

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby pgn4web » Mon Mar 12, 2012 6:04 pm

Uly wrote:Firefox 4.0. The scrollbar sometimes is eaten completely and doesn't appear on screen, but the user can still scroll with the mousewheel.


second though about the scrollbar issue, let me try a trick:

now YOU DONT SEE the scrollbars (but you can still scroll with the mouse or keyboard):

[Event "WCh"]
[Site "Reykjavik"]
[Date "1972"]
[Round "13"]
[White "Spassky"]
[Black "Fischer"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 g6 5. Bc4 Nb6 6. Bb3 Bg7
7. Nbd2 O-O 8. h3 a5 9. a4 dxe5 10. dxe5 Na6 11. O-O Nc5 12. Qe2 Qe8
13. Ne4 Nbxa4 14. Bxa4 Nxa4 15. Re1 Nb6 16. Bd2 a4 17. Bg5 h6 18. Bh4 Bf5
19. g4 Be6 20. Nd4 Bc4 21. Qd2 Qd7 22. Rad1 Rfe8 23. f4 Bd5 24. Nc5 Qc8
25. Qc3 e6 26. Kh2 Nd7 27. Nd3 c5 28. Nb5 Qc6 29. Nd6 Qxd6 30. exd6 Bxc3
31. bxc3 f6 32. g5 hxg5 33. fxg5 f5 34. Bg3 Kf7 35. Ne5+ Nxe5 36. Bxe5 b5
37. Rf1 Rh8 38. Bf6 a3 39. Rf4 a2 40. c4 Bxc4 41. d7 Bd5 42. Kg3 Ra3+
43. c3 Rha8 44. Rh4 e5 45. Rh7+ Ke6 46. Re7+ Kd6 47. Rxe5 Rxc3+ 48. Kf2 Rc2+
49. Ke1 Kxd7 50. Rexd5+ Kc6 51. Rd6+ Kb7 52. Rd7+ Ka6 53. R7d2 Rxd2 54. Kxd2 b4
55. h4 Kb5 56. h5 c4 57. Ra1 gxh5 58. g6 h4 59. g7 h3 60. Be7 Rg8
61. Bf8 h2 62. Kc2 Kc6 63. Rd1 b3+ 64. Kc3 h1=Q 65. Rxh1 Kd5 66. Kb2 f4
67. Rd1+ Ke4 68. Rc1 Kd3 69. Rd1+ Ke2 70. Rc1 f3 71. Bc5 Rxg7 72. Rxc4 Rd7
73. Re4+ Kf1 74. Bd4 f2 { a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
__________________________________________________________________________________________
}

now YOU SEE the scrollbars:

[Event "WCh"]
[Site "Reykjavik"]
[Date "1972"]
[Round "13"]
[White "Spassky"]
[Black "Fischer"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 g6 5. Bc4 Nb6 6. Bb3 Bg7
7. Nbd2 O-O 8. h3 a5 9. a4 dxe5 10. dxe5 Na6 11. O-O Nc5 12. Qe2 Qe8
13. Ne4 Nbxa4 14. Bxa4 Nxa4 15. Re1 Nb6 16. Bd2 a4 17. Bg5 h6 18. Bh4 Bf5
19. g4 Be6 20. Nd4 Bc4 21. Qd2 Qd7 22. Rad1 Rfe8 23. f4 Bd5 24. Nc5 Qc8
25. Qc3 e6 26. Kh2 Nd7 27. Nd3 c5 28. Nb5 Qc6 29. Nd6 Qxd6 30. exd6 Bxc3
31. bxc3 f6 32. g5 hxg5 33. fxg5 f5 34. Bg3 Kf7 35. Ne5+ Nxe5 36. Bxe5 b5
37. Rf1 Rh8 38. Bf6 a3 39. Rf4 a2 40. c4 Bxc4 41. d7 Bd5 42. Kg3 Ra3+
43. c3 Rha8 44. Rh4 e5 45. Rh7+ Ke6 46. Re7+ Kd6 47. Rxe5 Rxc3+ 48. Kf2 Rc2+
49. Ke1 Kxd7 50. Rexd5+ Kc6 51. Rd6+ Kb7 52. Rd7+ Ka6 53. R7d2 Rxd2 54. Kxd2 b4
55. h4 Kb5 56. h5 c4 57. Ra1 gxh5 58. g6 h4 59. g7 h3 60. Be7 Rg8
61. Bf8 h2 62. Kc2 Kc6 63. Rd1 b3+ 64. Kc3 h1=Q 65. Rxh1 Kd5 66. Kb2 f4
67. Rd1+ Ke4 68. Rc1 Kd3 69. Rd1+ Ke2 70. Rc1 f3 71. Bc5 Rxg7 72. Rxc4 Rd7
73. Re4+ Kf1 74. Bd4 f2 { a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars
a lot of comments at the end of the game to trigger scrollbars}

If I guessed right when you can and when you can't see the scrollbars, then everything is working just fine and you probably will have to live with that :-( ...and has nothing to do with using an obsolete FF4 (that you should better update anyway)

Let me know...
pgn4web
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:26 pm

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby pgn4web » Mon Mar 12, 2012 11:42 pm

I just released pgn4web 2.46 with variation support.

Thanks to everyone that helped with testing.

In addition to variation support, a basic support for puzzles has been introduced, you could use it by creating a separate bbcode like [puzzle], created exactly the same as the pgn one then changing:

&am=l& to &am=n&
&md=f& to &md=p&
&hd=j& to &hd=l&

Let me know if you need any help with your customizations, but it should be fairly straightforward.
pgn4web
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:26 pm

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby Jeremy Bernstein » Tue Mar 13, 2012 8:35 pm

pgn4web wrote:I just released pgn4web 2.46 with variation support.

Thanks to everyone that helped with testing.

In addition to variation support, a basic support for puzzles has been introduced, you could use it by creating a separate bbcode like [puzzle], created exactly the same as the pgn one then changing:

&am=l& to &am=n&
&md=f& to &md=p&
&hd=j& to &hd=l&

Let me know if you need any help with your customizations, but it should be fairly straightforward.


Great, thanks. I've migrated to the release version, will re-apply my customizations (or some version thereof) in the next couple of days, as time permits. Thanks a million for implementing variation support!

jb
Jeremy Bernstein
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1225
Joined: Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:49 am
Location: Berlin, Germany

Re: pgn4web testing thread

Postby Uly » Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:41 am

pgn4web wrote:If I guessed right when you can and when you can't see the scrollbars, then everything is working just fine and you probably will have to live with that :-( ...


Indeed. But why? Can't you make a horizontal scrollbar appear in where the user scrolls to the right to see the currently hidden vertical scrollbar?

@Jeremy: Can you make it optional for the user to use an old version of pgn4web? I don't think variation support is worth the new problems for me (and it's reasons like these I stuck with FF4 and old version of other software...)
User avatar
Uly
 
Posts: 838
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:33 am

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